Look. Don’t Look.

Shaped by human hands or time, bumping around near the edge of the ocean? Odd things are found while out walking – shards of pottery, bits of broken dishes, hunks of metal, wire, once even a cap to a water main. Flotsam and jetsam of life includes bones from animals (a pig tooth, which looks quite human but was later identified at a nearby university), and feathers. This triangular rock, though, still remains a puzzle. So far.

Is it an artifact or just an odd rock?

Is it an artifact or just an odd rock?

The lower “limbs” of this tree are actually poison ivy happily spreading out a canopy of leaflets. Note the rope-like vine that is growing parallel to the actual tree trunk. What an opportunist. The progression of flowers to tiny berries is interesting to observe. Look, but don’t touch – it is the actual sap from the poison ivy that causes an outbreak (in some) of an unforgettable rash. “Leaves of three, let it be” – good advice from Scouting days. More than 60 types of birds eat poison ivy berries – and personal preference is to cut the vine at the base on the theory that a poison sprayed on a plant may have unforeseen repercussions on animal life and humans.

Mimic.

Mimic.

Photos of life, seen on a walk, ride, mosey (which is not really a ride, and is much more than a walk).

Attack that red scary round thing.

Attack that red scary round thing.

One survivor of a weekend party was this red balloon, seen and feared by a Boston terrier who is obsessed with “get the ball” time every day of her life. She is learning how to be a dog again with long walks and new things to investigate. (By the way, she had great fun with the balloon which then popped. The shreds were picked up and disposed of properly. Note: Wildlife ingests balloons and pieces of them, so take any you celebrate with back home again. Here’s a link to why, provided by Audubon Magazine.

Soft mud captured the imprints of recent visitors.

Soft mud captured the imprints of recent visitors.

Animals communicate with markings, scent, behavior – sometimes quite loudly.
A baby bird between the folds of a massive maple tree's roots.

A baby bird between the folds of a massive maple tree’s roots.

An almost-fledged bird sounded off to its parents from where it landed below a nest in a knothole above. Other babies were peeping loudly overhead. This little bird actually clambered up the rough bark of the tree and clung there well camouflaged.

Three days later and after much-needed rain storms, no bird. Did he or she make it to fly? No evidence (feathers or a flurry in the earth below) was found to prove otherwise.

And this lone stalk of corn found growing near a parking lot area. Just a natural wonder.

Nature finds a way.

Nature finds a way.

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